Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay
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Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay


An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) or mobility shift electrophoresis, also referred as a gel shift assay, gel mobility shift assay, band shift assay, or gel retardation assay, is a common affinity electrophoresis technique used to study protein–DNA or protein–RNA interactions. This procedure can determine if a protein or mixture of proteins is capable of binding to a given DNA or RNA sequence, and can sometimes indicate if more than one protein molecule is involved in the binding complex. Gel shift assays are often performed in vitro concurrently with DNase footprinting, primer extension, and promoter-probe experiments when studying transcription initiation, DNA gang replication, DNA repair or RNA processing and maturation, as well as pre-mRNA splicing.

The assay is a routinely used biochemical technique to study the protein-DNA interaction in vitro. It is based on the principle that a protein-DNA complex will show a lower electrophoretic mobility (due to its larger size) leading to a retardation in mobility compared to free nucleic acid.


Service Process

-Receive Orders and Samples

-Experiment Design

-Synthesizing Probes

-EMSA Gel Preparation

-EMSA Reaction

-Gel Electrophoresis

-Gel Staining

-Project report writing


Sample Requirements

Cells: >107 cells

Animal tissue: not less than 400mg

Plant tissue: not less than 2g

Probe sequence

If the binding protein-specific antibody is used, the antibody should be more than 50 μL and the concentration should be more than 0.5 mg/mL.


Deliverables

Project report, including complete experimental process, experimental data and pictures.

Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay


An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) or mobility shift electrophoresis, also referred as a gel shift assay, gel mobility shift assay, band shift assay, or gel retardation assay, is a common affinity electrophoresis technique used to study protein–DNA or protein–RNA interactions. This procedure can determine if a protein or mixture of proteins is capable of binding to a given DNA or RNA sequence, and can sometimes indicate if more than one protein molecule is involved in the binding complex. Gel shift assays are often performed in vitro concurrently with DNase footprinting, primer extension, and promoter-probe experiments when studying transcription initiation, DNA gang replication, DNA repair or RNA processing and maturation, as well as pre-mRNA splicing.

The assay is a routinely used biochemical technique to study the protein-DNA interaction in vitro. It is based on the principle that a protein-DNA complex will show a lower electrophoretic mobility (due to its larger size) leading to a retardation in mobility compared to free nucleic acid.


Service Process

-Receive Orders and Samples

-Experiment Design

-Synthesizing Probes

-EMSA Gel Preparation

-EMSA Reaction

-Gel Electrophoresis

-Gel Staining

-Project report writing


Sample Requirements

Cells: >107 cells

Animal tissue: not less than 400mg

Plant tissue: not less than 2g

Probe sequence

If the binding protein-specific antibody is used, the antibody should be more than 50 μL and the concentration should be more than 0.5 mg/mL.


Deliverables

Project report, including complete experimental process, experimental data and pictures.

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